Hubert Burda Media

Whisky collector alert: You don’t want to miss Johnnie Walker’s first-ever 50-year-old blend, the John Walker Masters’ Edition


Heads up, Scotch collectors. Among the handsomest and most pedigreed releases from Johnnie Walker has just hit the market, and there are only 100 to go around.

The John Walker Masters’ Edition is the brand’s first-ever 50-year-old Scotch whisky blend, comprising a triple-matured brew concocted from some of the rarest and oldest stock in the Johnnie Walker family of distilleries.

Of the six constituents chosen by prolific Master Blender Jim Beveridge – on merit that they were operating in John Walker’s lifetime – five have since fallen silent (or gone ‘ghost’, as is the popular term),  meaning irreplaceable whisky has gone towards making this one-of-a-kind release.

(RELATED: These ‘ghost’ distilleries, however, have been or are going to be brought back from the dead.)

Slap these in fine individually-numbered black crystal decanters from French crystal masters Baccarat, and package them in a wooden encasement fit for the Queen (no, seriously – the Queen’s  Warwickshire-based cabinet maker was on the case) – and you get the perfect storm of quality, rarity and worksmanship that’ll either make a great investment or envy-inducing dinner banter.

We haven’t got around to tasting it yet, but the brand’s notes allude to blackcurrants and citrus against a creamy backdrop of dark chocolate. A smoky and menthol finish comforts the palate after.  If ever we have a second opinion, we’ll leave it here.

The single malts employed hail from Glenury Royal, Glen Albyn, and the hallowed Blair Athol, the last of which is still in operation today. The other half comprises grain whiskies from Port Dundas, Caledonian and Cambus.

Itching to get your hands on one? Free up at least $35,000 and ring up your pals at Diageo – or drop them an e-mail at privateclientsg@diageo.com.

(RELATED: If you’ve read this far, you’re exactly the sort who wants to make a trip down to Singapore’s first whisky museum – read our firsthand account.)

 

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