Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers

Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers

Adrift by celeb chef David Myers turns typical ideas on their heads with unexpected flavour combinations and cuisine crossovers

Alethea Tan
Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers
Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers
Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers

Walking into Adrift, I found myself looking out for interior themes that befitted the castaway-esque moniker. There was none of that. Instead, the restaurant exudes a smart but relaxed urban vibe.

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Past the entrance is a Ginza-style bar where cocktails take centre stage rather than beers, possibly to encourage diners to explore the unique concoctions by lauded New York bartender Sam Ross. There are 14 to try at S$23 a pop, and they come with bewildering names like Trouble Maker, Penicillin and Midnight Stinger. The only familiar one is the Singapore Sling but even this has been given an interesting twist.

Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers-am_il_v1001_i_a9e0a14709e030f1d58bca8cfeb04b8511_d07af4f9847c190f6dd993fbd21b601a71
Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers-am_il_v1001_i_08f4355e634cf86ef2751832f69a3ba407_7aefa373d5f294533160828dcf4e595179

The dining area is impressive. The menu, on the other hand, baffles. While it displays Myers' passion for combining Asian flavours with a Western twist, some of the proposed flavour combinations had my left eyebrow caught in a fish hook.

An example is the preserved green papaya soup ($29) with Maine lobster and sago. When it arrived, I found myself thrown off a metaphorical mechanical bull. There is not a jot of sourness. Rather, it’s surprisingly creamy like a green hued coconut soup. Unexpected flavours are matched by surprising textures in another dish, the grilled Maine lobster ($33). It came with a trio of grilled mochi that’s made in-house, although there is nothing soft or chewy in Myer’s version.

It dawned on me then that Adrift is a reference to Myer’s career that has spanned many countries and cuisines, and what he sets out to do is to take typical dishes and turning them on their head, bringing diners on a culinary adventure. It doesn’t always work but it keeps things interesting.

Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers-am_il_v1001_i_7f268ca538abebf079f9994269138c1e08_d2a6371b91db13422046eb0635b3d41249

Beef Tartare, Sesame, Egg Yolk, Chili

Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers-am_il_v1001_i_e2cfebff34bb19207639f7e0a431649211_8f12145952a3f0a6e511a743fb971f8165

Fried Oysters, Green Garlic, Black Lime Dip

Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers-am_il_v1001_i_6aea18a40776addd4ec664948565bd1613_7cba10889495146af73c6c85ce21170947

Ricotta, Preserved Lemon, Okinawan Black Sugar

This gave me a new appreciation of the sharp flavours in the cured hamachi ($27) paired with refreshing ginger flowers and the delicate ricotta toast ($24) topped with okinawan black sugar and preserved lemon.

The desserts were more than decent, with the raspberry parfait ($12) at the top of my list. When I bit into the accompanying cocoa mochi and discovered that it was as bouncy as mochi should be, which by now is a surprise in itself, it was like coming full circle.

Adrift is located at Marina Bay Sands Hotel lobby, Tower 2, tel. 6688 5657
This review was originally published in the April 2015 issue of August Man magazine.

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Restaurant Review: Adrift by David Myers
Adrift by celeb chef David Myers turns typical ideas on their heads with unexpected flavour combinations and cuisine crossovers
05/25/2015 02:52 pm
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